All ETDs from UAB

Advisory Committee Chair

Lila M Graves

Advisory Committee Members

Kyle Grimes

Peggy Jolly

Scott Snyder

Document Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2010

Degree Name by School

Master of Arts (MA) College of Arts and Sciences

Abstract

Online learning is expanding rapidly in higher education, a development which has led many scholars and educators to examine the benefits and weaknesses of instructional technology. While many scholars have written about the use of technology in teaching composition and English studies in general, there is a lack of scholarly research addressing the specific concerns of college-level literature teachers. In contrast to prevalent practice in the field of literary studies, my thesis addresses both pedagogical and technological questions. I believe that thinking critically about teaching practices in the field of literary studies is particularly important in the 21st century, when teaching strategies are being transformed along with the rise of educational technology. In this thesis, I am interested in exploring a range of possibilities for teaching literature online. I have focused my study specifically on UAB's 200-level literature survey courses, a core curriculum requirement for all undergraduates. I first examine the goals and objectives of UAB's 200-level literature courses as they are listed on a sampling of departmental course syllabi. Then, I discuss the teaching methods that UAB literature teachers typically employ in the traditional 200-level literature classroom, specifically focusing on how these methods correlate with course goals and objectives. Lastly, I explain how these teaching methods can be replicated in the online environment of Blackboard. I suggest that teachers who utilize Blackboard's teaching tools in 200-level literature courses are well-equipped to effectively align their instruction with course goals and objectives.

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