All ETDs from UAB

Advisory Committee Chair

Kathleen C Brown

Advisory Committee Members

Connie L Kohler

Elizabeth H Maples

Na-Jin Park

Erica R Pryor

Document Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

2010

Degree Name by School

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) School of Nursing

Abstract

ABSTRACT Occupational stress, a common occurrence among various professions worldwide, is regarded as a major occupational health problem for healthcare professionals especially nurses. Occupational stress has been reported to affect job satisfaction and job performance among nurses, thus compromising nursing care and placing patients' lives at risk. Stress is a complex phenomenon resulting from the interaction between individuals and the environment. Therefore, significant differences in occupational stress, job satisfaction and job performance among nurses may exist due to different work settings. The aims of the study were to: 1) examine the relationships between occupational stress, job satisfaction and job performance among hospital nurses in Kampala City, Uganda; 2) establish whether personal background characteristics affect the relationships between occupational stress, job satisfaction and job performance; and 3) examine whether there is a difference in levels of occupational stress, job satisfaction and job performance by type of hospital. A non-experimental correlational design was used in the study. A total of 333 nurses from four hospitals completed the Nurse Stress Index, the Job Satisfaction Survey, and the Six-Dimensional Scale of Nurse Performance scales. Study findings demonstrated that there were significant differences in levels of occupational stress, job satisfaction and job performance between the public and private not-for- profit hospitals. Nurses in the public hospital reported higher levels of occupational stress and lower levels of job satisfaction and performance. There were significant negative relationships between occupational stress and job performance and between occupational stress and job satisfaction. Nursing experience, type of hospital, and number of children had a statistically significant relationship with occupational stress, job satisfaction and job performance. Type of hospital (public versus private), ward (obstetrics/gynecology versus other ward types), and job satisfaction were significant predictors of self-rated quality of job performance. Job satisfaction was shown to mediate the relationship between occupational stress and job performance. Large scale studies were recommended to identify sources of occupational stress and factors that enhance job satisfaction among hospital nurses in Uganda. Future research is needed to examine best practices for human resource managers to improve nurse motivation, job satisfaction and nurse performance in hospitals.

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Nursing Commons

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