All ETDs from UAB

Advisory Committee Chair

Tim R Nagy

Advisory Committee Members

Daniel L Smith

David B Allison

Casey D Morrow

Robin G Lorenz

Document Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

2014

Degree Name by School

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) School of Health Professions

Abstract

The gut microbiome has been found to be associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes and many other diseases. Many studies have shown microbial composition changes with obese status or switching of diets. However, few of them have investigated the long-term microbial changes in subjects under the same environmental factors. This study examined gut microbiome changes in multiple aspects with well-controlled diet-induced obese mice models and demonstrated the following: there were great variations in gut microbiome composition and diversity in the same strain of inbred mice under the same environment and diet; certain lineages of bacteria were associated with digestive efficiency; gut microbiome changes were dose dependent on different levels of calorie restriction; gut microbiome were relatively stable in adult aging under fixed feeding regimen; weight cycling through manipulating the amounts of diet intake could have differential effects on microbiome composition and specific categories of bacteria; and microbial compositions at a younger age were different between short-lived and long-lived mice. In summary, this study provides substantial insight into the roles of gut microbiome in obesity, calorie restriction and aging with well-controlled experimental subjects and conditions. These results also provide a rationale for future interventional study and subsequent clinical application in the prevention and treatment of obesity, as well as potential strategies for promoting longevity.

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